GE buys two European 3D printing companies – Deutsche Welle


September 8, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


General Electric (GE) announced Tuesday its plans to pay $1.4 billion (1.3 billion euros) to acquire two companies – one in Germany and another in Sweden – that manufacture machine parts with 3D printers.

The two firms would be put under GE’s aviation division, which is currently developing a propjet engine for Cessna planes made largely from 3D printed components.

The German company is SLM Solutions Group, of which GE has long been a customer. It makes laser equipment for use in 3D printing for the aeronautics, energy, health care and automobile industries.

The other is Arcam AB, based in Molndal, Sweden. It specializes in the use of electron beams in the 3D printing of metallic parts for the aeronautics and health care industries.

A number of companies are turning to 3D printing as it allows them to save on manufacturing costs since there is less waste left over. 3D-printed parts are also lighter and more robust than normal machine components, making them ideal for use in airplanes, for instance.

GE expects to be earning up to $1 billion a year from its 3D printing arm by 2020. It also foresees savings on production costs totaling between $3-5 billion over the next ten years.

cjc/uhe (AFP, Reuters)

General Electric (GE) announced Tuesday its plans to pay $1.4 billion (1.3 billion euros) to acquire two companies – one in Germany and another in Sweden – that manufacture machine parts with 3D printers.

The two firms would be put under GE’s aviation division, which is currently developing a propjet engine for Cessna planes made largely from 3D printed components.

The German company is SLM Solutions Group, of which GE has long been a customer. It makes laser equipment for use in 3D printing for the aeronautics, energy, health care and automobile industries.

The other is Arcam AB, based in Molndal, Sweden. It specializes in the use of electron beams in the 3D printing of metallic parts for the aeronautics and health care industries.

A number of companies are turning to 3D printing as it allows them to save on manufacturing costs since there is less waste left over. 3D-printed parts are also lighter and more robust than normal machine components, making them ideal for use in airplanes, for instance.

GE expects to be earning up to $1 billion a year from its 3D printing arm by 2020. It also foresees savings on production costs totaling between $3-5 billion over the next ten years.

cjc/uhe (AFP, Reuters)

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