China: 3D Printed House Makes Debut in Shandong Province, Phase One of Ongoing Project – 3DPrint.com


September 9, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


villa 2

[Photo: 3Ddayin.net]

While there has initially been some question over why it’s taken so long for 3D printing to make more of a splash in the construction industry, it would seem that developments of late should quiet that talk right down—especially as true proof of concept is seen with structures such as the latest 3D printed house in China.

Built in Binzhou City, which is located in East China’s Shandong Province, news of the home is just being released. Fabricated with concrete, the builder states that this 3D printed home, constructed in just two months, is actually more cost-effective to make and more environmentally friendly too.

This looks like quite a nice piece of real estate to own, featuring a Jiangnan style floor plan, along with two courtyards for enjoying the fresh air as well. This is just the first phase of the 3D printing construction project, as they continue to build in what is referred to as an ongoing park project, according to 3D printing Binzhou Creative Industry Park project leader Liao Xiaojun.

three villaThe 3D printed home is move-in ready, and features conventional comforts such as air conditioning. All of the buildings in the project will boast a similar look, and as the second phase commences and is completed, citizens can look forward to enjoying a visually appealing area with other buildings created for entrepreneurship training, experiments and other projects.

While the builders and those involved are well-aware that 3D printing has been widely speculated about and sometimes even referred to as a gimmick, they are optimistic about its future in China, stating that they see it as becoming a revolution within the global construction industry. Xiaojun explains that they see this being a trend for construction in the future, not only because homes can be built in such a short time, but they can also be so easily customized toward the homeowner’s needs.

home

[Photo: Ecns.cn]

Massive 3D printers allowed for the speed in production, along with the use of liquid materials and computer control for true precision. The printers used are 20 meters wide and 6 meters high, and with the amount of accuracy they provide, there is very little waste in material. They see the process as being very ecologically friendly, and expect this to change the construction process substantially from the long, drawn-out, noisy, dusty experience most are used to.

dbc21e80971044a1a8e314a7ec46a151Each layer of material can have a thickness of up to 3cm, stacked one upon each other until they compose an entire home. Offering pleasing aesthetics and all the basic comforts, these houses will display all of the the expected insulation, electrical features, and structural integrity that homeowner’s are seeking—along with what they refer to as ‘personalized architecture.’

In terms of affordability, Xiaojun states that the 3D printed homes really are ‘not that expensive.’The overall cost is about 5,000 yuan per square meter, and Xiaojun sees prices continuing to come down as technology progresses.

house 1This just adds to the activity we’ve seen in China regarding 3D printing in numerous sectors now—with not just a six-story apartment building and other modular homes, but also other industrial items such as aircraft components, 3D printed air conditioners, and interesting hobbyist items such as an entirely 3D printed bike and much more.

Other countries are certainly making strides as well as we’ve reported extensively on the long-term plan currently ongoing in Dubai, resulting in the first 3D printed office building, with more ahead too as they have stated that by 2030, they hope to see twenty five percent of their buildings being made through 3D printing. These are just a few examples of progress happening around the world, with 3D printing in concrete for the construction industry beginning to accelerate—even to include the 3D printed village, Shamballa, currently underway in Italy. Discuss further in the 3D Printed House in China over at 3DPB.com.

[Sources/Images: Ecns.cn; 3Ddayin.net; ]

villa 2

[Photo: 3Ddayin.net]

While there has initially been some question over why it’s taken so long for 3D printing to make more of a splash in the construction industry, it would seem that developments of late should quiet that talk right down—especially as true proof of concept is seen with structures such as the latest 3D printed house in China.

Built in Binzhou City, which is located in East China’s Shandong Province, news of the home is just being released. Fabricated with concrete, the builder states that this 3D printed home, constructed in just two months, is actually more cost-effective to make and more environmentally friendly too.

This looks like quite a nice piece of real estate to own, featuring a Jiangnan style floor plan, along with two courtyards for enjoying the fresh air as well. This is just the first phase of the 3D printing construction project, as they continue to build in what is referred to as an ongoing park project, according to 3D printing Binzhou Creative Industry Park project leader Liao Xiaojun.

three villaThe 3D printed home is move-in ready, and features conventional comforts such as air conditioning. All of the buildings in the project will boast a similar look, and as the second phase commences and is completed, citizens can look forward to enjoying a visually appealing area with other buildings created for entrepreneurship training, experiments and other projects.

While the builders and those involved are well-aware that 3D printing has been widely speculated about and sometimes even referred to as a gimmick, they are optimistic about its future in China, stating that they see it as becoming a revolution within the global construction industry. Xiaojun explains that they see this being a trend for construction in the future, not only because homes can be built in such a short time, but they can also be so easily customized toward the homeowner’s needs.

home

[Photo: Ecns.cn]

Massive 3D printers allowed for the speed in production, along with the use of liquid materials and computer control for true precision. The printers used are 20 meters wide and 6 meters high, and with the amount of accuracy they provide, there is very little waste in material. They see the process as being very ecologically friendly, and expect this to change the construction process substantially from the long, drawn-out, noisy, dusty experience most are used to.

dbc21e80971044a1a8e314a7ec46a151Each layer of material can have a thickness of up to 3cm, stacked one upon each other until they compose an entire home. Offering pleasing aesthetics and all the basic comforts, these houses will display all of the the expected insulation, electrical features, and structural integrity that homeowner’s are seeking—along with what they refer to as ‘personalized architecture.’

In terms of affordability, Xiaojun states that the 3D printed homes really are ‘not that expensive.’The overall cost is about 5,000 yuan per square meter, and Xiaojun sees prices continuing to come down as technology progresses.

house 1This just adds to the activity we’ve seen in China regarding 3D printing in numerous sectors now—with not just a six-story apartment building and other modular homes, but also other industrial items such as aircraft components, 3D printed air conditioners, and interesting hobbyist items such as an entirely 3D printed bike and much more.

Other countries are certainly making strides as well as we’ve reported extensively on the long-term plan currently ongoing in Dubai, resulting in the first 3D printed office building, with more ahead too as they have stated that by 2030, they hope to see twenty five percent of their buildings being made through 3D printing. These are just a few examples of progress happening around the world, with 3D printing in concrete for the construction industry beginning to accelerate—even to include the 3D printed village, Shamballa, currently underway in Italy. Discuss further in the 3D Printed House in China over at 3DPB.com.

[Sources/Images: Ecns.cn; 3Ddayin.net; ]

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