Kiwi's 3D-printed models raise $70K on Kickstarter – Stuff.co.nz


July 3, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


Matt Barker is selling 3D-printable scenery for tabletop wargaming.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

Matt Barker is selling 3D-printable scenery for tabletop wargaming.

A Kiwi company that sells 3D-printed effects for war gaming could revolutionise the model industry, its owner says.

Paraparaumu man Matt Barker’s company Printable Scenery has crowd-funded over $70,000 in its latest Kickstarter campaign.

Barker makes scenery for hobbyist modellers who play tabletop games like Warhammer and Dungeons and Dragons.

Barker think 3D printing has the potential to revolutionise the model industry.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

Barker think 3D printing has the potential to revolutionise the model industry.

Paying customers download the designs, print them off on their own 3D printers and then paint them. The size of the pieces can be adjusted so they fit with different games and hobbies.

READ MORE: 
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First freeform 3D printed house wins design challenge
Air New Zealand uses 3D printers to make seat parts

 

He has raised over $70,000 on Kickstarter.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

He has raised over $70,000 on Kickstarter.

Barker said his approach was cheaper, easier and quicker than traditional ways of making models.

“The model industry I think is going to be revolutionised by 3D printing. I don’t know when it’s going to happen, but it’s inevitable.”

He has a background in television production and animation, and drew on that background when he started Printable Scenery three years ago. He is still involved with television production through his other company, Catalyst Creative.

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He now employs five people “virtually full-time” making models to service more than 2000 regular customers from around the world.

Barker’s latest Kickstarter is his most profitable. People who put money towards it can choose from three sets of ruins: one set for fantasy war gaming, one for sci-fi, and one for World War II battles – or they can get all three.

Barker is a hobbyist war-gamer himself, and said that helped him understand what people wanted from their models.

“I’ve got a good feel for the gaming market, for these guys, because I’m one of them.”

He said he expected 3D printers to become more advanced and more widespread as the technology developed.

“I think there’s a little bit of hesitation now with getting a 3D printer. What is it, how does it work? But as soon as someone gets one and gets their head around it, they’re away.”

 – Sunday Star Times

Matt Barker is selling 3D-printable scenery for tabletop wargaming.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

Matt Barker is selling 3D-printable scenery for tabletop wargaming.

A Kiwi company that sells 3D-printed effects for war gaming could revolutionise the model industry, its owner says.

Paraparaumu man Matt Barker’s company Printable Scenery has crowd-funded over $70,000 in its latest Kickstarter campaign.

Barker makes scenery for hobbyist modellers who play tabletop games like Warhammer and Dungeons and Dragons.

Barker think 3D printing has the potential to revolutionise the model industry.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

Barker think 3D printing has the potential to revolutionise the model industry.

Paying customers download the designs, print them off on their own 3D printers and then paint them. The size of the pieces can be adjusted so they fit with different games and hobbies.

READ MORE: 
The Blade: the world’s first 3D-printed supercar
First freeform 3D printed house wins design challenge
Air New Zealand uses 3D printers to make seat parts

 

He has raised over $70,000 on Kickstarter.

MONIQUE FORD / FAIRFAX NZ

He has raised over $70,000 on Kickstarter.

Barker said his approach was cheaper, easier and quicker than traditional ways of making models.

“The model industry I think is going to be revolutionised by 3D printing. I don’t know when it’s going to happen, but it’s inevitable.”

He has a background in television production and animation, and drew on that background when he started Printable Scenery three years ago. He is still involved with television production through his other company, Catalyst Creative.

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He now employs five people “virtually full-time” making models to service more than 2000 regular customers from around the world.

Barker’s latest Kickstarter is his most profitable. People who put money towards it can choose from three sets of ruins: one set for fantasy war gaming, one for sci-fi, and one for World War II battles – or they can get all three.

Barker is a hobbyist war-gamer himself, and said that helped him understand what people wanted from their models.

“I’ve got a good feel for the gaming market, for these guys, because I’m one of them.”

He said he expected 3D printers to become more advanced and more widespread as the technology developed.

“I think there’s a little bit of hesitation now with getting a 3D printer. What is it, how does it work? But as soon as someone gets one and gets their head around it, they’re away.”

 – Sunday Star Times

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