“Curve Appeal” will be globe's first Freeform 3D printed house – Archinect


July 6, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


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A rendering of the mostly 3D printed "Curve Appeal." Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio

A rendering of the mostly 3D printed “Curve Appeal.” Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio

First, it was an office, and now, it’s an entire 3D printed house. Well, mostly 3D printed: while the “primary vertical structure, roof, and large portions of the facade will be freeform 3D printed, the glass enclosure and interior finishes will be conventional construction” for the future Chattanooga, Tennessee house, according to a Forbes article. 

Freeform 3D printing is far more versatile than traditional 3D printing, primarily because it allows designers to create shapes in open space, while traditional 3D printing requires that the printer be larger than the object it is trying to create.

In this particular case, a 3D-printed matrix of carbon-reinforced ABS plastic will be used to print the complex outer facade of the house. No official construction cost has been released as of yet; the 800 square foot house, which was designed by WATG’s Urban Architecture Studio, has an estimated completion date of 2017. 

More in 3D printing news:

Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio
Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio


anchor

A rendering of the mostly 3D printed "Curve Appeal." Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio

A rendering of the mostly 3D printed “Curve Appeal.” Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio

First, it was an office, and now, it’s an entire 3D printed house. Well, mostly 3D printed: while the “primary vertical structure, roof, and large portions of the facade will be freeform 3D printed, the glass enclosure and interior finishes will be conventional construction” for the future Chattanooga, Tennessee house, according to a Forbes article. 

Freeform 3D printing is far more versatile than traditional 3D printing, primarily because it allows designers to create shapes in open space, while traditional 3D printing requires that the printer be larger than the object it is trying to create.

In this particular case, a 3D-printed matrix of carbon-reinforced ABS plastic will be used to print the complex outer facade of the house. No official construction cost has been released as of yet; the 800 square foot house, which was designed by WATG’s Urban Architecture Studio, has an estimated completion date of 2017. 

More in 3D printing news:

Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio
Image: Daniel Caven/WATG Chicago Urban Architecture Studio


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