3D-printed prosthetic device helps Shawnee boy ride bike – KMBC Kansas City


July 13, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


A Shawnee man who spent weeks looking for a special device to help teach his son how to ride a bike decided to have one custom-made.

Hudson Borton, 3, is an active young boy.

“He’s already proud he got stitches a couple of weeks ago,” said Nick Borton, Hudson’s father.

Hudson may be a little too active. That’s why his family couldn’t wait to give him something that will help him steer a bicycle.

The boy has been missing part of his left arm since birth. He needs a prosthetic adapter to help him steer a bike.

A prototype lab at Metropolitan Community College was able to create that prosthetic with a 3-D printer.

David Valdez helped design the device, something he said brought joy to his heart.

“He looks so happy,” Valdez said, seeing Hudson on the bike.

The prosthetic has a replaceable part that will help it grow with Hudson.

“As he grows we can make a new cone, but the clamp stays exactly the same,” said Mike Cline, a programming engineer at Metropolitan Community College.

“Seeing your son ride a bike for the first time is a great experience,” said Borton.

The adapter’s unofficial name right now is the Hudson. The family hopes the invention will lead to more items that can help kids like Hudson do more things naturally.

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A Shawnee man who spent weeks looking for a special device to help teach his son how to ride a bike decided to have one custom-made.

Hudson Borton, 3, is an active young boy.

“He’s already proud he got stitches a couple of weeks ago,” said Nick Borton, Hudson’s father.

Hudson may be a little too active. That’s why his family couldn’t wait to give him something that will help him steer a bicycle.

The boy has been missing part of his left arm since birth. He needs a prosthetic adapter to help him steer a bike.

A prototype lab at Metropolitan Community College was able to create that prosthetic with a 3-D printer.

David Valdez helped design the device, something he said brought joy to his heart.

“He looks so happy,” Valdez said, seeing Hudson on the bike.

The prosthetic has a replaceable part that will help it grow with Hudson.

“As he grows we can make a new cone, but the clamp stays exactly the same,” said Mike Cline, a programming engineer at Metropolitan Community College.

“Seeing your son ride a bike for the first time is a great experience,” said Borton.

The adapter’s unofficial name right now is the Hudson. The family hopes the invention will lead to more items that can help kids like Hudson do more things naturally.

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