Linux Kernel 3.2.82 LTS Is Out with Btrfs and x86 Improvements, Updated Drivers – Softpedia News


August 24, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Uncategorized


Linux kernel developer Ben Hutchings announced the availability of a new maintenance update for the long-term supported Linux 3.2 kernel series, version 3.2.82.

Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS comes two months after the launch of the Linux kernel 3.2.81 LTS update, and according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the previous point release, it changes a total of 87 files, with 999 insertions and 468 deletions. Of course, the biggest part of the patch is driver updates, and the rest is spread out between architectures, filesystems, core networking, and the sound stack.

“I’m announcing the release of the 3.2.82 kernel. All users of the 3.2 kernel series should upgrade,” says Ben Hutchings. “”The updated 3.2.y git tree can be found at: https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-3.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git.”

x86 and Btrfs fixes, InfiniBand driver updates

As mentioned before, most of the changes included in the Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS release are updated drivers, and it looks like, this time, the kernel developers managed to improve those for ACPI, ATA, InfiniBand, Crypto, Radeon, MMC, MTD, PCI, s390, SCSI, TTY, USB, and Xen devices. Continuing, there are various enhancements to the x86 hardware architecture, as well as some small fixes to PowerPC (PPC), PA-RISC, MIPS, Alpha, and ARM.

The Btrfs file system also received multiple improvements in Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS, and there are some small changes for the CIFS, eCryptfs, EXT4, NFS, UBIFS, and NILFS2 filesystems as well. Moreover, a KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) issue was fixed, the sound stack got some improvements to PCI devices, and the networking stack has been updated with B.A.T.M.A.N. Advanced, IPv4, TIPC (Transparent Inter-Process Communication), and Reliable Datagram Sockets (RDS) changes.

If you’re using a GNU/Linux distribution powered by a kernel from the long-term supported Linux 3.2 kernel series, we recommend that you update as soon as possible to the Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS release. To do that, make sure that all the security patches released on the main software repositories of your OS have been applied, using the default package manager, of course. OS vendors and power users can compile the kernel themselves by downloading the sources from kernel.org or via our website.

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